Ballston Beach from the air looks a bit like a battle scar, the dunes flattened by

Ballston Beach from the air looks a bit like a battle scar, the dunes flattened by frequent storms. Image by John Tlumacki. United States, 2019. To traverse the Sagamore, from the north, or the Bourne, from the west, is to cross the boundary between work and play. As the last girder shrinks in the rearview mirror, the road opens onto the pine-fringed mid-Cape expressway. Already those knotted neck muscles are beginning to soften and uncoil. The beaches we love — Marconi, Cahoon Hollow, Nauset, to name three — are still miles away. But the worst of the dreaded Cape traffic is behind us now. We are in a postcard land that evokes a particular memory, a four-word poem, for anyone who has had the good fortune to experience it: Summer on the Cape. But this is no vacation. The Cape we love is at risk now. Cape Cod is perched on a stretch of ocean warming faster than nearly any in the world. And as much as we might wish it away, as hard as we try to ignore it, the effects of climate change here are already visible, tangible, measurable, disturbing. Perfect summers have grown hotter and muggier. Storms arrive violently, and more often. Occasionally, nature sends up an even more ostentat...

Army Researchers Refine 3D-Printed Concrete Barracks | 2018-08-14

The 3D-printed concrete barracks requires a crew of only three trained workers during construction, though for continuous printing, about three shifts of crews are required to avoid burnout. U.S. Army Corp. of Engineers’ researchers, leading a team that recently completed the 3D printing of 9.5-ft-tall reinforced concrete walls for a 32-ft x 16-ft  barracks, are setting their sights on a future project–3D printing of concrete roof beams—even before they put the precast concrete lid on the printed walls. The current research is considered the first to “definitively” demonstrate through full-scale prototype testing that a 3D-printed concrete barracks with a precast roof can be engineered to be structurally safe for occupancy. “To our knowledge, before us, no one has done the structural testing to show they are safe,” which is the main reason why there are no 3D-printed concrete barracks in use, says Michael Case, the program manager for the project, called Automated Construction of Expeditionary Structures (ACES), which is within the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center. ACES is funded by about $250,000 from the U.S. Marine Corps, ...